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Traveling With Your System

Traveling With a Neurostimulator

Generally, traveling with a neurostimulator is easy and safe. With a little planning and communication with your doctor, your loved ones and travel companions, you can enjoy a healthy, happy trip with confidence.

First, consult your doctor

It is important to notify your doctor about your plans. He or she can:

  • Help you find a doctor to connect with at your destination, just in case you need care. This is especially important if you will be away for more than a month.
  • Help you think through how to manage any possible issues
  • Provide you with other information that might be relevant

What to bring with you

In addition to following recommendations from your doctor, make sure to bring:

  • Your patient identification (ID) card which you should carry wherever you go. 
  • Your patient controller, so you can adjust your therapy
  • Your charger, if you have a rechargeable system. 
  • An adapter for your charger, if you are traveling in a country with a different electrical outlet system
  • Phone numbers for your doctor and your St. Jude Medical representative, in case you have questions

Air travel

If you will be traveling by plane, keep in mind that certain metal detectors and anti-theft devices may affect stimulation. When you go through security checkpoints at the airport, show your patient ID card to security personal and ask how best to proceed. If you must go through a metal detector or anti-theft device, turn off your neurostimulator and proceed with caution, moving quickly through the device. Once you pass through the detector or device, be sure to check the status of your IPG.

Car and RV travel

Car travel is a fun and flexible way to get away, but it is important that you turn your neurostimulator off while driving a car. This is because the stimulation you receive from your neurostimulator can vary in intensity, depending on your body position. This variability can be distracting and make it unsafe to drive. You may, however, ride as a passenger with your system turned on.